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kara

Kara is a city in northern Togo, situated in Kara Region, 413 km north of the capital Lomé. Kara is the capital of the Kara region. The Kara River flows through the city and is its main resource of water. Originally known as Lama-Kara, the city developed from the village of this name that still exists into an administrative centre. Etienne Eyadéma was born in the nearby village of Piya.

Kara includes a busy market place, numerous hotels, banks, the Prefecture, a brewery and the Congress Hall which was the seat of the Rally of the Togolese People Party before the advent of democracy. Niamtougou International Airport is located 40 kilometers north of Kara.

Population: 98,878 (2010)

 

The currency of Togo is the West African franc, which is also the currency of seven other independent African states: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, and Senegal. You can freely use this currency in each of these nations, although those leaving the region should exchange their local currency to US dollars, euro, or pounds sterling. ATMs are limited to Lome. It is best to withdraw money from a bank. Credit cards are accepted in large hotels in Togo, with Visa currently the most universally accepted. Cash should always be carried, however.

 

Weather

Weather in Kara is influenced by Tropical Wet & Dry climate. Winter dry season. There are more than two months with less than 60 mm (2.4\”) . All average monthly temperatures are greater than 18°C (64°F).
The hottest month is February, when max temperature is about 32℃ Usually third week is the hottest. But be aware of Rain and Thunderstorm. The coldest month is July. In this month temperature could be even 23℃ at night! And be prepared for Rain and Thunderstorm

Language


Kabye, Kotokoli, Bassar, Ewe, French

Health and security


Togo remains one of the poorest nations in the world and development-related challenges are numerous. Wealth is distributed unequally: while the wealthiest twenty per cent dispose of roughly half of Togo’s total household income, those who find themselves on the bottom steps of the socioeconomic ladder often struggle to survive. Many years of political isolation have further aggravated the living conditions of the country’s population.Today, 32 per cent of Togolese live in poverty. Tens of thousands remain without access to housing, medical infrastructure and education. For a vast proportion of people who live in rural areas, access to potable water remains nothing but wishful thinking.Less than one in five Togolese is able to use improved sanitation facilities, which increases the speed at which dangerous infectious diseases spread. Although considerably higher than in many other African nations, life expectancy is still fairly low at 62 years.The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains one of Togo’s most striking public health concerns. 3.2 per cent of the population are HIV-positive. Although access to anti-retroviral therapy has noticeably improved over recent years, much more needs to be done in order to fight the disease.
Despite recent efforts to improve literacy, only five in ten Togolese know how to read and write.

Kara is one of the safest, funnest and culturally intriguing places on the planet

Economy


Subsistence agriculture is the main economic activity in Kara; the majority of the population depends on subsistence agriculture. Food and cash crop production employs the majority of the labor force and contributes about 42{3c2c8e2a416fc88253b822a3742dd8ca2370d01b9d785477d0909a22775da03a} to the gross domestic product (GDP). Coffee and cocoa are traditionally the major cash crops for export, but cotton cultivation increased rapidly in the 1990s, with 173,000 metric tons produced in 1999.

After a disastrous harvest in 2001 (113,000 metric tons), production rebounded to 168,000 metric tons in 2002. Despite insufficient rainfall in some areas, the Togolese Government has achieved its goal of self-sufficiency in food crops — maize, cassava, yams, sorghum, pearl millet, and groundnut. Small and medium-sized farms produce most of the food crop; the average farm size is one to three hectares.

Culture

Each year, a traditional wrestling tournament takes places that is the first step in the initiation rite of young Kabyè’s development into adulthood.

Activities

Congress Palace

Congress Palace

Hotel Kara

Hotel Kara

University of Kara

University of Kara

Kara Street

Kara Street

Park Sarakawa

Park Sarakawa

Traditional Wrestling

Traditional Wrestling

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